News from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/TopBlueBar2014.jpg

DEP Calendar of Events

June 4
DEP public hearing to receive testimony on the Proposed Infrastructure State Implementation Plans (SIP) Revision for 2008 Ozone, 2010 NO2, 2010 SO2, and 2012 PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and Proposed SIP Revision Addressing Clean Air Act Section 128 for all NAAQS, 10 a.m.-noon, Schuylkill River Room, DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main Street, Norristown. Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436.

June 4
DEP public hearing to receive testimony on the Proposed Infrastructure State Implementation Plans (SIP) Revision for 2008 Ozone, 2010 NO2, 2010 SO2, and 2012 PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and Proposed SIP Revision Addressing Clean Air Act Section 128 for all NAAQS, 10 a.m.-noon, Juniata River Room, DEP Southcentral Regional Office, 909 Elmerton Ave. Harrisburg. Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436.

June 4
DEP public hearing on the Proposed Infrastructure State Implementation Plans (SIP) Revision for 2008 Ozone, 2010 NO2, 2010 SO2, and 2012 PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and Proposed SIP Revision Addressing Clean Air Act Section 128 for all NAAQS, 10 a.m.-noon, Waterfront A Room, DEP Southwest Regional Office, 400 Waterfront Dr., Pittsburgh. Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436.

June 5
Solid Waste Advisory Committee meeting, 10 a.m., Room 105, Rachel Carson State Office Building, 400 Market St., Harrisburg.?
Contact: Ali Tarquino Morris, 717-783-2630.

June 10
Board of Coal Mine Safety meeting, 10 a.m., DEP Cambria Office, 286 Industrial Park Rd., Ebensburg. Contact: Allison D. Gaida, 724-439-7289.

June 10
Public meeting on the Intended Use Plans for the EPA FY14 Drinking Water and Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund Capitalization Grants, 10 a.m., 2nd Floor Auditorium, Rachel Carson State Office Building, 400 Market St., Harrisburg.  Contact:  Veronica Kasi, 717-772-4053.

June 12
DEP Northeast Regional Roundtable quarterly meeting, 8:45 a.m.-noon, group will tour Seneca Landfill and the MarkWest Bluestone gas plant in Butler County. Contact: Gary Clark, 814-332-6615.

June 12
Radiation Protection Advisory Committee meeting, 9 a.m., 14th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson State Office Building, 400 Market St., Harrisburg.  Contact Joseph Melnic, 717-783-9730.

June 12
DEP Public Hearing on a Proposed Maintenance Plan and Redesignation Request for the Pennsylvania portion of the Philadelphia PM2.5 Nonattainment Area, 1 p.m., DEP Southeast Regional Office, 2 East Main St., Norristown.  Contact: Nancy Herb, 717-783-9269.

June 17
Citizens Advisory Council meeting, 10 a.m., Room 105, Rachel Carson State Office Building, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg.  Contact: Jen Swan, 717-783-8727.

June 26
DEP public hearing on HSCA Prompt Interim Response at the McQuaid Property and Nearby Areas in the Borough of Aspinwall and O'Hara Township in Allegheny County, 6:30 p.m., Aspinwall Borough Building, 217? Commercial Ave., Aspinwall. Contact: John Poister, 412-442-4000.

July 9
Technical Advisory Committee on Diesel-Powered Equipment meeting, 10 a.m., Fayette County Health Center, 100 New Salem Rd., Uniontown. Contact: Allison D. Gaida, 724-439-7289.

July 15
Environmental Quality Board meeting, 9 a.m., Room 105, Rachel Carson State Office Building, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg. Contact: Jen Swan, 717-783-8727.

July 15
Citizens Advisory Council meeting, 10 a.m., Room 105, Rachel Carson State Office Building, 400 Market Street, Harrisburg. Contact: Jen Swan, 717-783-8727.

July 23
Small Business Compliance Advisory Committee meeting, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 12th Floor Conference Room, Rachel Carson State Office Building, 400 Market St., Harrisburg. Contact: Susan Foster, 717-787-7019.

Public Input

June 6
Deadline to comment on the Proposed Revisions to the Infrastructure State Implementation Plans (SIPs) for the 2008 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS, 2010 1-Hour NO2 NAAQS, 2010 1-Hour SO2 NAAQS, and 2012 Annual Fine Particular Matter NAAQS. Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436.

June 9
Deadline to comment on Pennsylvania’s 2014-2015 Annual Ambient Air Monitoring Network Plan. Contact Nicholas Lazor, 717-783-9268.

June 10
Deadline to comment on the 2014 Draft Integrated Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Report.  Contact Molly Pulket, 717-783-2949.

June 10
Deadline to comment on Proposed State Implementation Plan Revision: Redesignation Request and Maintenance Plan for the Pennsylvania Portion of the Philadelphia-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE Nonattainment Area for the 1997 Annual and 2006 24-Hour Fine Particulate Matter National Ambient Air Quality Standards.  Contact Nancy Herb, 717-783-9269.

June 13
Deadline to comment on the proposed State Implementation Plan Revision: Redesignation Request and Maintenance Plan for the Pennsylvania Portion of the Philadelphia-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE Nonattainment Area for the 1997 Annual and 2006 24-Hour Fine Particulate Matter National Ambient Air Quality Standards.  Contact Nancy Herb, 717-783-9269EC]]

June 17
Deadline to comment on the proposed Administration of the Land Recycling Program rulemaking.  Contact Troy Conrad, 717-783-7816.

June 23
Deadline to comment on Pennsylvania Function Based Aquatic Resource Compensation Protocol Technical Guidance Document (DEP ID:310-2137-001). Contact Kenneth Murin, 717-787-7411.

June 23
Deadline to comment on Pennsylvania Wetland Condition Level 2 Rapid Assessment Protocol Technical Guidance Document (DEP ID: 310-2137-002). Contact Kenneth Murin, 717-787-7411.

June 23
Deadline to comment on Pennsylvania Riverine Condition Level 2 Rapid Assessment Protocol Technical Guidance Document (DEP ID: 310-2137-003). Contact Kenneth Murin, 717-787-7411.

June 23
Deadline to comment on Pennsylvania Lacustrine Condition Level 2 Rapid Assessment Protocol Technical Guidance Document (DEP ID: 800-4000-002).  Contact Kenneth Murin, 717-787- 7411. 2

June 30
Deadline to comment on Proposed Rulemaking: Additional RACT Requirements for Major Sources of NOx and VOCs (25 Pa. Code Chapters 121 and 129).  Contact: Kirit Dalal, 717-772-3436.

June 30
Deadline to comment on the Intended Use Plans for the EPA FY14 Drinking Water and Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund Capitalization Grants.  Contact:  Veronica Kasi, 717-772-4053.

July 7
Deadline to comment on the Blaster's License Suspension and Revocation Procedure.  Contact Richard Lamkie, 814-472-1885.

Speakers' Bureau

 

Subscribe

How Pennsylvania is Regulating Methane from the Oil and Gas Industry

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/Users/10612/Oil%26Gas%20well.jpg

HARRISBURG  Pennsylvania set the bar for tough emission requirements and is a national leader in creating and implementing stringent enforceable regulations on the oil and gas industry.

As the first state in the country to require a comprehensive leak detection and repair program at natural gas operations, Pennsylvania has led the way in protecting public health and the environment from emissions resulting from natural gas operations in the Marcellus Shale region of the state. Today, although implemented differently than other states, we continue to regulate methane as stringently and effectively as any other state in the nation.

Here’s a glance into what we require:

Pennsylvania’s leak detection programs require operators to conduct leak detection and repair programs monthly using audible, visual and odor detection methods. In addition, on a quarterly basis, operators must use leak detection monitoring devices, such as a forward looking infrared camera, to detect methane leaks. All methane leaks at compressor stations or processing facilities must be fully repaired, completely eliminating the leak in 15 days or less.

On well pads, leak detection and repair must be conducted annually and include the entire well pad, not just the natural gas liquids tanks and piping as required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the oil and gas sector. Going above what is required by EPA, any detected leaks on well pads in Pennsylvania are also required to be repaired within 15 days. Failure to comply with any criteria associated with the operation of a well pad may result in the requirement for that operator to cease operations.

DEP also incorporates leak detection and repair requirements as a permit condition for natural gas transmission projects. Once again going beyond what is federally required, Pennsylvania has also directed owners and operators of certain traditional oil and natural gas sources to report their emissions annually.

It is also important to note that Pennsylvania’s leak detection and repair programs not only control methane, they also are established to control volatile organic compounds and the associated hazardous air pollutants.

So, how do we compare to other states? Under the administration of Governor Corbett, environmental protection standards for the natural gas industry are among the most extensive and comprehensive in the nation. It has been and will continue to be our utmost priority to ensure that this valuable energy resource is produced and used with the safety, health and well-being of Pennsylvanians in the forefront.

A more detailed state-by-state comparison of how methane is being regulated in Pennsylvania and in other energy-producing states, is available here.

Commonwealth Financing Authority Announces New Alternative, Clean Energy Investments

HARRISBURG – The Department of Community and Economic Development on May 27 announced that Pennsylvania is expanding its commitment to advance clean and alternative energy sources with the investment of more than $3.4 million in grants through the Commonwealth Financing Authority.

“The Corbett administration recognizes the importance of expanding our investments in the energy sector as we continue to make Pennsylvania a leader in the field,” said Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary C. Alan Walker. “Our investments in alternative and clean energy continue to result in cost savings for businesses and residents as well as new jobs for Pennsylvanians.”

Read more.

New CNG Project, Fueling Complex Dedicated in Lancaster

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/Users/10612/LSWMA%20CNG%20truck.jpg

This is one of the authority's 14 new CNG-fueled trucks in its new fleet.

LANCASTER  DEP participated in a ceremony May 22 to mark the dedication and grand opening of the Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority (LCSMA)'s new $4.8 million compressed natural gas (CNG) project.

The authority's project includes 14 new Peterbilt transfer trucks with Cummins-Westport ISX 12L CNG engines, costing around $2.2 million. LCSWMA purchased the fleet in 2013 and transitioned them into operation last month. The trucks transfer waste from LCSWMA’s Transfer Station in Lancaster to its waste-to-energy facilities in Bainbridge and Harrisburg, as well as to its landfill in Conestoga. Previously, LCSWMA used diesel-powered trucks that consumed an average of 140,000 gallons of diesel fuel annually.

To help offset the incremental difference (37 percent) of purchasing the CNG trucks versus diesel trucks, LCSWMA received a $350,000 grant from DEP, as part of the Pennsylvania Natural Gas Energy Development Program.

Converting its fleet also required LCSMWA to install CNG fueling infrastructure at its Transfer Station Complex. While LCSWMA will utilize a time-fill (overnight) fueling system with 18 dispensers for its fleet, this project also includes a fast-fill fueling system with four dispensers for waste haulers and other select fleets. Total cost for construction of the dual-station CNG fueling infrastructure was about $2.6 million. This is the first system of its kind in Lancaster County.

So far, LCSWMA has agreements with Good’s Disposal, the City of Lancaster and DEP, and is in discussions with Clean Energy,UGI and several other commercial fleets to use the CNG fast-fill station. LCSWMA expects that number to steadily increase as more companies become aware of the centrality and convenience of the fast-fill CNG station, as well as the economic and environmental incentives to make the switch from diesel to natural gas.

For more information, visit LCSWMA's website at http://www.lcswma.org/.  

Tour Highlights Environmental Benefits of Manure Digesters

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/Users/10612/digerster.JPG

DEP Secretary Abruzzo and Agriculture Secretary Grieg  examine the anaerobic manure digester on the Sensenig farm.

QUARRYVILLE  DEP Secretary E. Christopher Abruzzo and External Affairs Director Katherine Hetherington Cunfer participated in the Center for Dairy Excellence (CDE) Bio Digester Tour on May 20 with visits to Cliff and Andrea Sensenigs’ Farm and the S&A Kreider Farm in Lancaster County. Also participating in the tour was Agriculture Secretary George Grieg, Agriculture Deputy Secretary for Consumer Protection and Regulatory Affairs Jay Howes, CDE Executive Director John Frey, State Conservation Commission Director Karl Brown, and Lancaster County District Administration Don McNutt.

The tour focused on the exemplary stewardship being conducted by the Sensenig and Kreider family farms. Cliff and Andrea Sensenig operate a 100 cow dairy and Scott and Herb Kreider, along with their sons, operate a 1,300 cow dairy. Both farms use manure digesters to process the manure from their dairy operations and the Sensenigs' digester also pipes in manure from neighboring hog, poultry and dairy farms operated by extended family that combine their wastes to make the digester more economical.

Anaerobic manure digesters (or methane digesters) collect manure and through a process of decomposing the organic matter in the manure with bacteria at 120-130 degrees F in the absence of oxygen produce methane gas which is used to produce renewable energy for on-farm or off-farm use.  The digesters can also process food waste and other organic materials.  The dry sterilized solids from the manure digester are then used for animal bedding.

The use of the manure digester helps manage the manure on these farms and limits the nitrogen and phosphorus from the manure from getting into the Conowingo Creek, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.  Pennsylvania has over two dozen manure digesters in production and the typical farm size is 500 cows or more. The Sensenigs’ operation is unique because it combines the manure from three farms, via underground pipes as well as food waste and was recognized by the Department of Agriculture with a proclamation to highlight the success of the project.

This small farm co-op approach makes the digester profitable for all three farms while producing the bedding needed by the two dairy farms. The hog and poultry farm is compensated for the litter, which had been a source of income before the digester. The digester helped the Sensenigs turn around the profitability of the farm and with assistance of state and federal grant funding; they are now selling their excess energy back to PPL.

DEP works closely with the local conservation districts and the agricultural community to find winning solutions like manure digesters and other conservation practices. To learn more about these programs, please visit DEP’s Bureau of Conservation and Restoration webpage. For more information on opportunities through the CDE, visit http://centerfordairyexcellence.org/. 

DEP Releases 2013 Susquehanna River Study Report

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/Users/10612/Susquehanna%20River%20study.JPG

DEP staff conduct Periphyton (Algal/Diatom) sampling.

HARRISBURG  The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) on May 21 released the 2013 Susquehanna River Sampling Report, detailing the latest results from the aggressive sampling effort across the Susquehanna River and many of its tributaries.

“Our efforts on the Susquehanna River over the past two years represent an unprecedented amount of study. The agency has dedicated a great amount of staff time on this river,” DEP Secretary E. Christopher Abruzzo said. “We are learning more every day, but there is still work to be done.”

During the 2013 sampling season, DEP staff spent 927 staff working days collecting samples on the river.

Major sampling sites included the Susquehanna at Marietta, Harrisburg and Sunbury, and the Juniata at Lewistown Narrows and Newport. There were control sites on the Delaware at Trenton, the Allegheny at Franklin and the Youghiogheny at Sutersville to establish a baseline for water quality.

Read more.

DEP Citizens’ Advisory Council Releases 2013 Annual Report, Invites New Members

HARRISBURG  The Citizens’ Advisory Council (CAC) to the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) on May 22 released its annual report detailing activities and accomplishments from 2013.

Terry Dayton, CAC Chairman, encouraged the governor, legislators, DEP and the public to be part of the dialogue. “Council plays an integral role in helping to shape environmental policy in the commonwealth by highlighting those issues that are most important to the citizens of this state,” he said.

Dayton also said that the CAC is in a unique position to provide advice to DEP because it reflects a broad and diverse perspective.

Read more

EPA Awards Five Pa. Communities, Organizations Nearly $2 Million in Brownfields Grants

WASHINGTON D.C.  Five Pennsylvania communities/organizations were among  171 selected nationwide to receive brownfields funding to clean and redevelop contaminated properties, boost local economies and leverage jobs while protecting public health and the environment.

The FY14 Brownfields Assessment, Revolving Loan Fund, and Cleanup (ARC) grants will give communities and businesses a chance to return economic stability to under-served and economically disadvantaged neighborhoods through the assessment and clean-up of abandoned industrial and commercial properties, places where environmental cleanups and new jobs are most needed.

Beaver County and the North Side Industrial Development Co. in Allegheny County each received FY14 Brownfields Assessment Grants totaling $1.2 million to address hazardous substances and petroleum. In Beaver and Allegheny counties, the grants will enable the coalition partners to build on earlier planning efforts in positioning the use of brownfields sites for future industrial growth opportunities and revitalize the river corridors.

Lawrence County received $400,000 to assess sites with hazardous substance and petroleum contamination.

Earth Conservancy received a $200,000 Brownfields Cleanup Grant to clean up the Warrior Run site, a 13.3 acre parcel of mine-scarred land adjacent to a residential area off Slope Street in Luzerne County. The Blue Coal Corp. used the property as a repository for mining waste until it declared bankruptcy in the mid-1970s. Runoff from the waste rock and low-grade coal is contributing abandoned mine drainage to the watershed. Grant funds will be used to move and recontour materials to the appropriate grade for residential redevelopment. Grant funds also will be used to conduct community involvement activities.

The  Energy Coordinating Agency (ECA) of Philadelphia received a $199,205 Brownfields Workforce Development and Job Training Grant to train 67 students, place 48 graduates in environmental jobs, and track graduates for one year. In addition, ECA anticipates that three graduates will pursue further education. The training program includes coursework in 40-hour HAZWOPER; underground storage tank remediation; solid waste management; OSHA 10; EPA lead renovation, repair and painting; environmental technology and lead dust sampling procedures; wastewater treatment and stormwater management; asbestos removal; mold abatement; and worker health and safety.  [[EC]]

Participants will earn seven federal or state certifications and licenses. ECA is targeting unemployed and underemployed, disadvantaged residents of Philadelphia, with a focus on individuals living in the severely distressed neighborhood located directly north of the city's downtown core. Key partners include Philadelphia Works, Impact Services, Philadelphia Housing Authority, Philadelphia Water Department, the Community College of Philadelphia, and a number of community-based organizations and environmental employers.

For more information brownfields grants by state, visit EPA’s website.

DEP Awards $944,819 Mine Reclamation Contract in Clearfield County

WILLIAMSPORT  DEP recently awarded a $944,819 contract for the Salem Church abandoned mine reclamation project in Boggs and Bradford townships, Clearfield County.

Comprised of two separate sites about three miles apart, the Salem Church project will include grading, excavating, erosion control turf reinforcement, wildlife brush barriers and seeding.

“This important project will not only restore about 66 acres of scarred land in two municipalities, but also help ensure the safety of local residents and those who use the area for recreational activities,” DEP Deputy Secretary for the Office of Active and Abandoned Mine Operations John Stefanko said.

Read more.

Coal Refuse Pile Fire Extinguished in Fell Township

WILKES-BARRE  A coal refuse pile fire that has been burning for more than four months on parts of a seven-acre tract of land above abandoned mines in Fell Township, Lackawanna County, has been extinguished. Minichi Inc. of Pittston was contracted by DEP to extinguish the blaze.

“The contractor worked 24 hours a day, seven days a week these past few months, sometimes through bitter cold temperatures, to successfully expose and put out the fire,” DEP Bureau of Abandoned Mine Reclamation Program Manager Michael C. Korb said. “We are confident the job is complete.”

DEP was first notified of the fire in December 2013 by the Grattan-Singer Volunteer Hose Company in Fell Township. Minichi, Inc. began work to extinguish the fire in January of 2014.

DEP Staff Recognized for Reponse to I-81 Tanker Fire & Spill

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/Users/10612/81%20tanker%20fire%20group.JPG

DEP Secretary Abruzzo , far right, with DEP employees recognized for I-81 tanker fire response.

HARRISBURG  DEP Secretary E. Christopher Abruzzo visited the department's South-central Regional Office on May 16 to present certificates of recognition to those staff who participated in the cleanup efforts following a large tanker truck fire that happened a year ago on an overpass of Interstate-81 in Susquehanna Township, Dauphin County.  The fire occurred after a tanker truck carrying 7,500 gallons of fuel overturned and caught fire, leading to closing of a widely used ramp to to Route 322 from the city for months.

More than two dozen DEP staff worked with PennDOT, area emergency responders and the Dauphin County Hazardous Materials unit to place containment booms and search multiple outfalls for contamination as diesel fuel made its way into a storm drain and into the nearby Paxton Creek. The area is located beside the Wildwood Wetlands and fuel eventually seeped into Wildwood Lake.

Over the initial response and weeks and months following the incident, DEP staff: 

- Assisted withe the cleanup/remediation of wetland vegetation;

- Assisted with asbestos abatement and demolition notices prior to demolition of the bridge structure;

- Ensured the surface water intakes for Steelton and Harrisburg were not affected by the contamination;

- Ensured that potentially contaminated concrete was properly disposed; and

- Provided Act 2 clean-up/remediation assistance.

DEP Names John Guth as Northwest Regional Director

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/Users/10612/John%20Guth.JPG

DEP Northwest Regional Director John Guth.

HARRISBURG  DEP Secretary E. Christopher Abruzzo announced on May 19 that John Guth, Environmental Program Manager for Air Quality, has been named regional director of the agency’s Northwest office effective today, May 19, 2014.

“John’s strong background working with the regulated community, coordinating with local governments, directing and managing staff and serving with the region’s emergency response team has more than prepared him for his new role as regional director,” Abruzzo said. “His vast experience and dedication to the department’s important mission has earned him respect both inside and outside DEP. I am confident that he will continue to serve with diligence.”

Guth began his career at DEP conducting field investigations for the Waste Management Program in 1985, and was promoted to Solid Waste Supervisor in 1993 to supervise employees conducting municipal, residual and hazardous waste inspections, compliance assistance and enforcement. Guth was again promoted in 2002 to the position of Solid Waste Manager. In this role, Guth directed all supervisors in the Solid Waste Program.

Read more.

DEP's Logan Honored as Finalist for Financial Executive of the Year

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/Users/10612/jeff%20logan%20award.JPG

Joining DEP's Jeff Logan, center, are (l-r) award sponsors Steven Stewart, M&T Bank; Rick HogentoglerStambaugh Ness;, Steven Masterson, BDO; and Dr. Jefrey Woodall, York College of Pennsylvania.

HARRISBURG  DEP Executive Deputy Secretary for Administration and Management Jeffrey M. Logan was honored recently by the Central Penn Business Journal as a finalist in its 2014 Financial Executives of the Year program.

The projgram was created to honor Central Pennsylvania's financial executives who contribute to the region's economid growth and stability.

Logan, who oversees DEP's business management and finance functions including the agency's $657 million budget and 2,727 employees, was nominated in the Government/School District/Municipality category.

Logan told the Journal what he most enjoys about working at DEP is working with millennials. "Millennials are creative and not afraid to challenge the status quo, which keeps me on my toes."

Logan is founder of DEP's future leaders program, and serves as the governor's appointee and finance chair to the $130 million Great Lakes Protection Fund.  He holds a BS and MBA from Penn State University.

Penncrest High School Tops 2014 Pennsylvania State Envirothon

http://media.state.pa.us/2238/Users/10612/envirothon%20winners.jpg

Delaware County's Penncrest High School wins the 2014 Pennsylvania Envirothon.

SELINSGROVE  The five-member team from Penncrest High School in Delaware County is the winner of the 2014 Pennsylvania Envirothon, scoring 522.33 points of a possible 600. 

The 31st Envirothon competition was held May 20-21 at Susquehanna University and PPL Montour Prerserve.  High school students from 64 Pennsylvania counties participated in in this year’s event.

Teams participate in a series of field station tests that focus on five topic areas – soils and land use, aquatic ecology, forestry, wildlife and environmental issues.  The 2014 current environmental issue focused on Sustainable Agriculture/Buying Local. The teams also prepare and deliver oral presentations to panels of judges who evaluate each team on its problem-solving capabilities, oral presentation skills and recommendations to help solve the specific environmental challenge, which relates to the current environmental issue.

Rounding out the top five finishers were:  second place – YHSA Homeschoolers, York County, with a score of 520; third place – Carmichaels Area High School, Greene County, with a score of 510; fourth place – Palmyra Area High School, Lebanon County, with a score of 482; and fifth place – Downingtown East High School, Chester County, with a score of 481.33.

The Pennsylvania Envirothon awarded scholarships to the first, second, and third place teams. The scholarships were sponsored by Pennsylvania’s County Conservation Districts and Pennsylvania Envirothon. Each of the top ten teams received a plaque and other prizes.

For more information on the Envirothon program, contact your county conservation district or visit www.envirothonpa.org

FacebookYouTubeTwitter

Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection 400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17105

 

 

http://enews.state.pa.us/q/v_N7CwPHFTnFw04aY1sTouOr1ZDTsLfZcZhKYZgkKVCKfqpOWOitTTSO0